There is a saying that goes, “In life, if you’re going to feel good, you need two things — good shoes and a good mattress.” So today, let’s talk about those shoes.

Budgeting for good shoes seems senseless when you can walk through most large box stores and find a pair of shoes for under $20. So why the fuss about a good pair of shoes?

Well, your foot houses 26 bones, 30 joints, and more than 100 ligaments, tendons, and muscles. That’s a lot of real estate holding up your entire body.

Dr. Matthew Robison, a podiatrist at Aboite Podiatry, knows how important a pair of shoes is.

“Good shoes aid in the stability and support of your foot,” he said. “Not all feet are created equal, so finding a good shoe that fits properly will help with the alignment of your feet, ankles, knees, hips, and back — improving your overall posture and gait.”

There is an art to finding the right pair of shoes. Consider these tips when you’re out looking for that next pair of exercise, casual, or work shoes:

  • Measure your feet! Your size will change over time (and your feet will measure larger at the end of the day).
  • Both of your feet may not be identical sizes. Choose the shoe size that fits your bigger foot.
  • Know the width of your foot. While many shoe stores will have you convinced that everyone is a B-width, don’t believe it.
  • Shape matters. Look at the shape of the shoe and ask yourself if it resembles your foot. You know the saying — don’t try to put a square peg in a round hole.
  • Raise your heels while wearing your shoes. Do they slip out? If so, you may need more depth to your shoe.

Shoe manufacturers design shoes for a variety of purposes. Know your activity level and expectations before buying a pair of exercise shoes. Are you a runner or a walker? Do you play racquet sports or enjoy hiking on trails? Spend some time doing some research. Look at reviews. In the end, your feet (and your entire body) will thank you.

If your feet are hurting you, it’s possible that your shoes may be the culprit. If your pain is persistent, it’s a good idea to be seen by a podiatrist. Call Aboite Podiatry to schedule an appointment with one of our podiatrists today — no referral needed.

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